Poirot’s cuff links… also tracked down :)

You may remember the tracking down of Poirot’s silver-and-amethyst ring, and a link for purchasing, which was featured on this blog awhile ago. I now must thank  David Hart, fellow Poirot aficionado and avid prop-hunter, for bringing a new acquisition of his to my attention. He writes:

“I was able to find cuff links that are all but identical to Poirot’s. I found them on eBay and the only discernible difference is that his are double sided while these only have a gem on one side. They also match the ring you led me to perfectly!”

Here’s the picture!

And sure enough, a bit of eBay searching of my own led me to what looks like the same thing. Link here! Looks like they have multiple product they relist.

Thanks, David!

 

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Behind the Lens: My Life in Photos (by David Suchet)

I was idly seaching Book Depository (my go-to online bookstore) when this awfully intriguing book description came up…

“In the early days of my career, I didn’t think I stood a hope in hell. Look at me: I’m short, stocky, slightly overweight, deep of voice, passionate, dark haired, olive skinned, hardly your typical Englishman. What chance did I have, going into the world of British theatre?”

David Suchet has been a stalwart of British stage and screen for fifty years. From Shakespeare to Oscar Wilde, Freud to Poirot, Edward Teller to Doctor Who, Harold Pinter to Terence Rattigan, Questions of Faith to Decline and Fall, right up to 2019’s The Price, David has done it all. Throughout this spectacular career, David has never been without a camera, enabling him to vividly document his life in photographs. Seamlessly combining photo and memoir, Behind the Lens is the story of David’s remarkable life, showcasing his wonderfully evocative photographs and accompanied by his insightful and engaging commentary.

In Behind the Lens, David discusses his London upbringing and love of the city, his Jewish roots and how they have influenced his career, the importance of his faith, how he really feels about fame, his love of photography and music, and his processes as an actor. He looks back on his fifty-year career, including reflections on how the industry has changed, his personal highs and lows, and how he wants to be remembered. And, of course, life after Poirot and why he’s still grieving for the eccentric Belgian detective.

behindthelens

The future publication date is given as October 3, 2019. Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group. Hardcover, 320 (!!) pages. It’s available for pre-order here!

 

New art giveaway

I did promise a giveaway this week, so here we go… winner gets this brand new painting I promised.  🙂

To enter, reply on this blog post or on my related Tweet with one of your favorite random Poirot quotes. The more obscure, the better! Let’s see if we can share and bring out some that aren’t heard as often.   🙂  Winner will be drawn randomly next Friday, the 21. (Also, how in the world is it already June 14???????)

Good luck!

New Poirot sketch

I am very bad– I managed to miss May altogether for the blog! Bad Kelly!

By way of apology, here’s a new little Poirot sketch in acrylics; 5″x7″ on canvas board. Want to win it? I’ll have a new giveaway for it next week here on the blog.  🙂

Dead Man’s Folly plot hole?

****SPOILERS as always****

With Hattie Stubbs missing, it seems likely a recent photograph of her would have been circulated in the papers and far and wide. Etienne de Sousa just had to catch a glimpse of one, and surely a lot of plot would have fallen apart.

The impetus for the shape of the disappearance of Hattie, as devised by the villains, was the fact that Etienne de Sousa had written to announce his imminent arrival. They knew that although it had been some years that Etienne had met Hattie, he would not have been deceived by an imposter– Poirot points out this motive in the final chapter. Hattie must disappear. Since the Tuckers are being nuisances as well, they devise murder and disappearance in a way that casts suspicion on De Sousa.

I just don’t see how they could have gotten round the “photograph in the paper” problem all too well…

‘Don’t bother about me,’ [Mrs Oliver] said to Poirot. ‘I’m just remembering if there’s anything I’ve forgotten.’

Sir George laughed heartily.

‘The fatal flaw, eh?’ he remarked.

‘That’s just it,’ said Mrs Oliver. ‘There always is one. Sometimes one doesn’t realize it until a book’s actually in print. And then it’s agony!’ Her face reflected this emotion. She sighed. ‘The curious thing is that most people never notice it. I say to myself, “But of course the cook would have been bound to notice that two cutlets hadn’t been eaten.” But nobody else thinks of it at all.’

Dead Man’s Folly

Valentine’s Day giveaway!!!

I’ve been meaning to do another art giveaway for ages, but life keeps getting in the way. In fact it’s been a month or so since I’ve posted here at all– January has been hectic with Candlewick Theatre, as we’ve been rushing to get Thorton Wilder’s play “The Matchmaker” together in less than a month. As well as showing at Morden’s Kenmor Theatre, it was our Valentine’s dinner theatre production this year, wrapping up on February 10. We’re all exhausted! (Here’s me in my character of Flora Van Huysen:)

BUT ANYWAY, you’re here for the Poirot giveaway.  🙂  Comment on this blog post and you’ll be entered to win this little 8″x10″ acrylic sketch on canvas board of Poirot, Hastings, and Japp! Image is taken from the episode The Affair at the Victory Ball. I will be drawing a winner one week from now, February 21. Good luck and happy Valentine’s Day!!!